Blog Post #3

During our final visit to the National Archives, I was only able to find four out of the eleven files that I was hoping to find. Two files had no relevancy to our topic, however, and the other two files were from the first box I was given on our first trip to the archives. I wanted to take better notes and that box was filled with good cases of people inflicted with a disease or other limitations which usually led to deportation. Since our group had divided presentation duties, I had a better focus on what I needed to look for in the files I was able to find.

For the presentation, I am in charge of the deportation of immigrants and the reasons for their deportation. One case I found was that of Guadalupe Garcia and her children [1]. They were trying to enter the country through El Paso to join her husband and their father who had a stable job and a home for them to live. Inspectors and doctors found out that Guadalupe had a tumor in her thyroid gland, which caused her problems to earn a living. Along with the tumor, Guadalupe was illiterate, and inspectors excluded her because she would become an LPC. Her children were also excluded since they would have become public charges even though the father could have provided for all of them. I did further research through ancestry and found her papers that were filled to exit Mexico, however, the entire document is in Spanish. Only some information was understood, such as the doctor who inspected Mrs. Garcia, which just so happened to have been Dr. Hume, which other people in my group have previously mentioned in their blog posts.

Another case I saw was that of Clemencia Arreola [2]. During questioning, inspectors found out she had lied about her age. She told inspectors she was fifty-one, but in reality, she was forty. She was entering the country to join her son who lived in the United States with his wife, a brother, and two sisters, who were all dependants on him. Her son made $2 a day. Clemencia had a daughter back in Mexico she could easily live with, if not allowed to enter the country. She ended up excluded from the United States for being illiterate and due to the possibility of her becoming an LPC.

[1] File 54,671-005, accession E9, Subject Correspondence, 1906-1932, Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, RG 85 (National Archives, Washington, DC)

[2] File 54,671-012, accession E9, Subject Correspondence, 1906-1932, Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, RG 85 (National Archives, Washington, DC)

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